Great Lakes Brewing News February/March 2013 : Page 1

Best if Read by Feb/Mar 2013 Volume 18 Number 1 ILLUSTRATION BY: HANS GRANHEIM By Jeff Sparrow 5 Rabbit Cerveceria founders Isaac Showaki and Andres Araya first met while working for a consulting firm for a client in Panama. That cli-ent was Heineken. Here, the two con-sultants' passion for beer was aroused, even if they didn't quite know it at the time, and it would be many, many years before they followed their hearts. Like many future brewers, Isaac Showaki and John J. Hall on the Showaki became enamored with the PHOTO BY JEFF SPARROW. brew deck. beers in the craft beer bars, in his case in New York City. "I hated what I was doing; I didn't want to do that," said locations: Austin, Chicago, Los Angeles, Showaki, about his profession at the time. Miami and New York City. He contacted his friend Araya to convince The two business partners visited him to take the plunge with him into the Chicago during the first Chicago Craft beer world. Together they envisioned a Beer Week in 2010. They met many beery concept for the first Latin-American craft people, but one left a most lasting impres-brewery in the U.S. "We looked at our cul-sion: Randy Mosher. During CBS night at ture," explained Showaki. "Amazing food, the Map Room, he first introduced himself amazing architecture, incredible music, as a designer, but Showaki and Araya would but the beer is bland, it's so boring." Their soon find out that Mosher–writer, brewer, concept would be to infuse the flavors and gadgeteer—was so much more. aromas of Latin culture into U.S. craft beer. "Being part of a brewery was always a Showaki and Araya looked for the fantasy, like it is for a lot of home brewers," ideal city, one with an established Latin said Mosher. "But I wasn't willing to chuck population, plus people with beer knowl-everything else I had going on. Honestly, edge, but not a I'm good in the creative sphere but am an lot of breweries. abject failure at all kinds of business tasks." They narrowed An ideal partnership ensued, with Mosher it down to five taking care of designing and branding, and By Kristen Kuchar t’s simply a natural progres-sion: people who like good food usually learn to like good food, and vice versa. You’re not going to want a run of the mill, massed pro-duced, watered down beer to accompany an aged, perfectly cooked filet or an artisan cheese plate. And you aren’t going to want stale pretzels or greasy chips to accompany a fine craft beer. An apprecia-tion for one, leads to an appreciation of the other. Pairing food with beer brings a whole new dining and drinking experience, and has the ability to transform the flavors of both. Breweries and brewpubs across the Great Lakes region are pairing beer with food, put-ting beer in their food, and doing it all with the same passion and devotion that got them brewing in the first place. Cooking and pairing foods with wines is familiar to everyone, but in many ways, using great beers can work even better. See 5 Rabbit p. 4 INSIDE Event Calendar ..................... 3 The Beer Queendom ............ 8 Homebrewing ..................... 10 Beer Beacon ....................... 12 Jolly Giant .......................... 17 Map/Directory ................ 18-23 Cooking with Beer ............. 25 STATE BY STATE NEWS Michigan ......... 14 SW Michigan .. 15 SE Michigan ... 16 Indiana ............ 24 Chicago .......... 26 Illinois ............. 27 Wisconsin ....... 28 N Wisconsin ... 29 Minnesota ....... 30 Ontario ........... 32 New York ........ 33 Pennsylvania .. 36 Ohio ................ 38 See Signature p. 6

The Evolution Of The Rabbit

Jeff Sparrow

5 Rabbit Cerveceria founders Isaac Showaki and Andres Araya first met while working for a consulting firm for a client in Panama. That client was Heineken. Here, the two consultants' passion for beer was aroused, even if they didn't quite know it at the time, and it would be many, many years before they followed their hearts.

Like many future brewers, Showaki became enamored with the beers in the craft beer bars, in his case in New York City. "I hated what I was doing; I didn't want to do that," said Showaki, about his profession at the time. He contacted his friend Araya to convince him to take the plunge with him into the beer world. Together they envisioned a concept for the first Latin-American craft brewery in the U.S. "We looked at our culture," explained Showaki. "Amazing food, amazing architecture, incredible music, but the beer is bland, it's so boring." Their concept would be to infuse the flavors and aromas of Latin culture into U.S. craft beer.

Showaki and Araya looked for the ideal city, one with an established Latin population, plus people with beer knowledge, but not a lot of breweries. They narrowed it down to five locations: Austin, Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami and New York City.

The two business partners visited Chicago during the first Chicago Craft Beer Week in 2010. They met many beery people, but one left a most lasting impression: Randy Mosher. During CBS night at the Map Room, he first introduced himself as a designer, but Showaki and Araya would soon find out that Mosher–writer, brewer, gadgeteer—was so much more.

"Being part of a brewery was always a fantasy, like it is for a lot of home brewers," said Mosher. "But I wasn't willing to chuck everything else I had going on. Honestly, I'm good in the creative sphere but am an abject failure at all kinds of business tasks." An ideal partnership ensued, with Mosher taking care of designing and branding, and creating the beers. "Since at the core of almost every craft brewery start up is a crazy passionate home brewer, recipes are the one thing they feel most confident about," Mosher stated. "They don't feel the need for outside help," Not so for Showaki and Araya, who had considerable business knowledge, but didn't truly understand how to make beer for themselves.

The name 5 Rabbit Cerveceria, however, was the idea of Showaki and Araya. According to Aztec legend, Mayahuel, the goddess of mescal, married Pantecatl, the god of fermentation, and they had 400 rabbits as offspring, each representing a stage of inebriation. One of the leaders-Rabbit—symbolized excess and over-indulgence, and seemed the perfect name for the new brewery.

Bringing It All Home

After brewing Mosher's 5 Rabbit recipes at five different contract breweries, the three partners found a spot for their own brewery in Bedford Park, south of Midway Airport. Problem was, they had the business people, and the creative person, but they didn't have anyone who actually knew how to make beer on a large scale. Enter John J. Hall, who has held a number of different titles at the Goose Island Beer Company.

On September 7, 2012, 15 years to the day since Hall began brewing at Goose, he made the hop to 5 Rabbit. Hall was ready for a new challenge, plus the opportunity to work with Mosher, whom he'd had as an instructor at several Siebel Institute courses. "I get to work with Randy and I don't have to pay for it," joked Hall.

"Up until recently, it's just been me putting the recipes together and pilot brewing," said Mosher. "Now we have John and the other brew staff as a resource, so we're becoming more collaborative." Indeed, Hall didn't arrive expecting to reinvent the wheel on his own. "We'll tweak them [Mosher's recipes] for this brew house, then we'll collaborate," said Hall. Showaki added, referring to Hall, "We get an incredible brewer, who will get us the best beer possible, but he also has an amazing creative side."

Creativity

The creative part of 5 Rabbit runs a bit different than at the usual brewery, where a brewer decides to make a particular style of beer, say an IPA. "The flavor and the story are equally important," Mosher explained. "And as the story develops, it adds cues for product development, which then feed back into the story." That's why you get a story gratis with the price of your pint. 5 Flower, 5 Grass, 5 Lizard and 5 Vulture, the year-around beers at 5 Rabbit Cerveceria, are derived as much from the tale behind them as from what goes into the brew kettle. Each of them are named after a sibling of the 5 Rabbit; each a different Latin tale in a bottle. Unique? Yes, just like the different paths of the four people who brought 5 Rabbit Cerveceria to life.

Read the full article at http://glbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/The+Evolution+Of+The+Rabbit/1324653/148010/article.html.

Signature Food Signature Beer

Kristen Kuchar

T's simply a natural progression: people who like good food usually learn to like good food, and vice versa. You're not going to want a run of the mill, massed produced, watered down beer to accompany an aged, perfectly cooked filet or an artisan cheese plate. And you aren't going to want stale pretzels or greasy chips to accompany a fine craft beer. An appreciation for one, leads to an appreciation of the other. Pairing food with beer brings a whole new dining and drinking experience, and has the ability to transform the flavors of both. Breweries and brewpubs across the Great Lakes region are pairing beer with food, putting beer in their food, and doing it all with the same passion and devotion that got them brewing in the first place.

Cooking and pairing foods with wines is familiar to everyone, but in many ways, using great beers can work even better. “Beer has a wider range of obvious flavors in varied styles and is more approachable to consumers,” says Jim Kuhr, Brewmaster at Saranac.

Variety makes the beer and food pairing process a more subjective one. “The right beer pairing depends much on your objective,” says Jamie Robinson, owner and head brewer and Northbound Smokehouse & Brewpub. “If you want to taste your beer while enjoying some buffalo wings, you’ll want an aggressive IPA. If you want something to chase the spicy hotness, you’ll want something lighter like a Pilsner or an American Wheat beer.”

Alternative Means

Some recommend pairing with flavors that are similar to one another, like a chocolate stout with a rich dessert. Others feel the opposite way, and like pairing two contrasting flavors to excite the palate; they note that new flavors are created when others are combined. For example, a triple-cream cheese can tone down the tartness of a sour beer, but on the other hand, you can pair that sour with a super sharp cheese to bring out the tanginess even more. As Robinson recommends, an IPA is often paired with spicy foods, but some feel that the hops actually heighten the heat, making the spice intolerable. In that case, something malty would be just the thing. The fact is, while plenty of beers and foods suggest one another, pairing them is not an exact science.

You have to figure in other variables, like texture: A silky porter may pair nicely with a creamy gorgonzola. “A flourless cake would pair better with a Russian Imperial Stout rather than a hop forward American Pale Ale,” Robinson says.

Usually, you don’t want the beer to overshadow the food, and many of today’s craft beers can easily accomplish that task. Great Lakes Brewing makes recommendations intended to keep either element from overwhelming the meal. That’s why they pair Lake Erie Monster, a strong, very bold Imperial IPA with bold flavors like aged cheeses, meaty steaks and pork chops or bitter dark chocolate. On the other hand, they recommend pairing Dortmunder Gold, a drinkable, more balanced beer, with foods like salads, fish and chicken.

Victory Brewing Company lists a recommended beer pairing alongside every single menu item on their food menu. Beef short rubs with a port reduction, parsnip puree and red onion jam can stand up to their HopDevil Ale, while the fussili pasta with lemon, garlic, vegetables and parmesan cheese goes well with a lighter Victory Lager.

Seek It Local

Brewpubs are putting just as much passion and time into their food as they are to their beer, and cooking with the same high quality, fresh ingredients they are brewing with. There is a strong focus on locally sourced, fresh foods. At Earth Bread & Brewery, they only use local premium flours in the dough production. Revolution Brewing in Chicago gets its meat every week from a local farm. Jolly Pumpkin Brewery uses tomatoes from Zenner Farm, and Werp Farm arugula on their dishes.

Motor City Brewing Works in Detroit is serving pizza, but with foodie lover ingredients like oven roasted pears and figs, anejo queso, and ground lamb with roasted garlic. Dock Street Brewing Co. Was voted best pizza by Philadelphia Magazine. To have a brewery outdo every pizza place in the city clearly says something about their food. Dock Street also only uses natural, organic beef throughout the menu, locally raised in Montgomery County.

Brewers taking it to the next level and cooking with their beers may seem obvious, but it’s a feat all it’s own. Again, there needs to be balance, and each flavor should not overwhelm but bring out the best in the next. “Hoppy or bitter beers tend to not be good for cooking because there are not many dishes were bitterness works,” Robinson says. “Porters and stouts on the other hand are good for many cooking applications, like brining, braising, and reductions.” Robinson recommends cooking with dark, malty beers like you would cook with red wine.

Signature Dishes

Great Lakes Brewing recommends pairing the dish with the beer used to create it for “a perfect marriage of flavor.s” So you’ll be drinking an Edmund Fitzgerald Porter along with the Alaskan cod that is battered with the same beer, or sipping Burning River Pale Ale with pretzel encrusted chicken served with their Burning River Pale Ale mustard sauce.

At Destil Gastropub, pair their Weissheimer with the hefeweizen-braised bratwurst served with sautéed red cabbage, applewood smoked bacon, ale sauerkraut, and topped with a smoked IPA mustard sauce. Two Brothers Brewery’s Cane & Ebel can be paired with mussels steamed in the same beer and finished with a spicy curry seasoning. Kalamazoo’s Bell’s Brewery has a Porter BBQ sauce on their marinated Tofu Wrap that goes perfectly with their award-winning porter, available year-round.

Dock Street Brewing has a barbeque sauce infused with Man Full of Trouble porter, Triumph Brewing serves a Triumph Ale mustard, and Three Floyd’s tops their double fudge brownie with an Alpha Klaus ice cream.

Kuhr of Saranac Brewing points out that cooking with a great beer to make a signature dish involves more than you might think. “When you cook with beer, you really have to understand the beer, its ingredients, and its characteristics beyond just the taste. Beer interacts with the food in ways that can be surprising. Flavors can be concentrated or evaporated, leaving behind notes that were not expected—both good and bad.”

For more, you can go to brewery and brewpub web sites, where many list their beers and multiple recipes that go with them. Great Lakes Brewing is a good place to start. But don’t stop there. Brewery Ommegang’s Abbey Ale can be used to make poached mussels, Ommegang Chili, or the Ginger Bread Ommegang Cake. Rare Vos is used to create Bistro Beef Stew, Cheddar Cheese Cake, and Braised Duck Legs in apple Rare Vos reduction with Prosciutto and Portabella mushrooms. And that is just the beginning.

Brewers taking it to the next level and cooking with their beers may seem obvious, but it’s a feat all it’s own.

Read the full article at http://glbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Signature+Food+Signature+Beer/1324660/148010/article.html.

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