Great Lakes Brewing News June/July 2014 : Page 1

By Kristen Kuchar Tracy Hurst of Metropolitan Brewing Co in Chicago, IL. PHOTO COURTESY OF METROPOLTAN BREWING B reaking barriers, busting into the boys club, overcoming discrimi-nation? Maybe not. While there are definitely obstacles expe-rienced by some women, generally, the consensus is that the beer industry feels like home. While there may be more men than women behind the scenes, that number con-tinues to even out as time goes on. “Our industry is inviting to anyone who’s willing to put in the work and effort,” Tracy Hurst, President and Co-Founder of Metropolitan Brewing in Chicago says. Hurst says it’s actually the media that hypes the industry as a boys club, and that it is more about dedication, hard-work, ingenuity, and a flair for risk-taking than it is about your sex. See Women p. 4 ith the explosion of new craft breweries within the Chicago city limits reaching nuclear proportions, one of the most anticipated new breweries of 2014 lies to the west of the Fox River. Penrose Brewing , the creation of two Goose Island alumni, opened this past April in the ex-urban city of Geneva, IL. Co-founder and brewer Tom Korder actually started his passion for brewing while working for Anheuser-Busch, where he worked in the Research Pilot Brewery, a small 15-Bbl brewery at the heart of their Saint Louis plant. "There I worked with a small group of people to brew beer, drag hoses and focus on new test recipes,” said Korder. An engineer by degree, Korder once managed the operations of the Goose Island production brewery, where he met his eventual partner Eric Hobbs. A Geneva native, Hobb's brings a sales and market-ing background to complement Korder's knowledge of beer and brewing. "We track our relationship back to a beer dinner we did together at Tiny Lounge in Chicago," See Penrose p. 6 W By Jeff Sparrow Tom Korder at the tanks at Penrose Brewing Co. Photo by Jeff Sparrow. PHOTOS COURTESY OF PENROSE BREWING INSIDE Event Calendar .....................3 Beers To Us! .........................9 Beer Beacon .......................10 The Beer Queendom ..........12 Homebrew:India Pale Lager 14 Map/Directory................ 18-23 State by State News Ohio ............... 16 Michigan ........ 18 SE Michigan .. 19 SW Michigan . 21 Indiana .......... 28 Chicago ......... 30 Illinois ........... 31 Wisconsin ..... 32 N Wisconsin .. 33 Minnesota ...... 34 Ontario .......... 36 New York ....... 38 Pennsylvania . 45

Women In Beer

Kristen Kuchar

Breaking barriers, busting into the boys club, overcoming discrimination? Maybe not.

While there are definitely obstacles experienced by some women, generally, the consensus is that the beer industry feels like home. While there may be more men than women behind the scenes, that number continues to even out as time goes on. “Our industry is inviting to anyone who’s willing to put in the work and effort,” Tracy Hurst, President and Co-Founder of Metropolitan Brewing in Chicago says. Hurst says it’s actually the media that hypes the industry as a boys club, and that it is more about dedication, hard-work, ingenuity, and a flair for risk-taking than it is about your sex.

Crafting Oportunities

The craft beer industry as a whole has the jump on macro beer producers. “From a marketing point of view, micro breweries have an ability to attract woman in ways that macro beer has completely failed,” says Mandie Murphy, owner of Left Field Brewery (Toronto). Murphy had her “mind blown” after discovering lambics, stouts, porters, and sours, which were a far cry from her father’s and grandfathers’ brews.

That talent for beer making is evident with women such as Deb Carey (New Glarus Brewing), Rene Greff (Arbor Brewing), Mary Bauer (Lagunitas Brewing), Carol Stoudt (Stoudt’s) and Stacy Block (Griffin Claw). Despite feeling a little like the “odd one out” while lobbying for the alcohol industry, Sarah Dawkins, of Wellington Brewery (Ontario), feels she didn’t encounter any obstacles as a female in the industry. In fact, she points out that in general, a women’s keen attention to detail can help craft a delicious beer.

The same is true for Christine Mulkins, who manages media relations for the Ontario Craft Brewers along with the annual Ontario Craft Beer Week and the Ontario Craft Brewers Conference. Mulkins combines her love of a full-flavored craft beer and public relation talents to work with brewers, which she enjoys because of their independence, entrepreneurial attitude, and creativity. In her work, she has notices a steady increase in women in the brewhouse and more women attending Niagra College’s School of Beer.

Science is for Girls

Claudia Jendron, Brewer at Temperance Beer Company in Evanston adds hopefully that growth will continue with more women interested in engineering and science, many of which could potentially add brewing to their field of interest. As a young college student herself, Jendron left the homebrewing to her male friends. But as time went on, and with a job at Goose Island, her passion for craft beer grew, and she was welcomed and encouraged to get hands-on.

She has a great respect for her fellow female brewers, and has fortunately received much more positive feedback than negative, but she has still experienced a few intimidating moments.

“Being a minority in any profession kind of puts you on a pedestal either to be a leader, or to fall down,” Jendron explained.

Getting Involved

Lucy Saunders, who is the Wisconsinbased founder of Beercook.com and author of Grilling with Beer and Best of American Beer & Food, experienced some skepticism herself when she created an all-volunteer conference on water conservation for brewers— they will hold their sixth conference this October. “Persistence is a virtue for women in beer industry,” Saunders says, Saunders, who attended Siebel Institute and apprenticed with pub chefs in London and Brussels. She loves the idea that more women are getting involved in state guilds to create stronger alliances and awareness. “There are still many more women involved with marketing beer than making it, so I look forward to seeing that ratio change,” she adds.

In many cases, the skeptics seem to be those outside of the industry, rather than fellow brewers. Eleanor Charlton and Andy Smith, of Split Rail Brewing Co. (Ontario), agree they have felt “underestimated” but welcomed by industry professionals. The brewery owners feel women can offer a unique aesthetic perspective and a valuable difference in palate preferences.

That underestimation is what Eilise Lane encounters outside of beer making. The owner of Scarlet Lane Brewing Company (Indiana) says men outside of the industry have two reactions when they meet her—who really brews the beer, or you’re my dream women. However, in the industry she has encountered nothing but respect and support. In fact, it was a female brewer that sparked her journey. She was sipping an amazing beer she wanted to learn more about and asked to speak with the brewer. When Lane received the response, ‘SHE isn’t in,’ she was inspired to brew her own.

Master Taster

Mirella Amato, founder of Beerology and author of Beerology: Everything You Need to Know to Enjoy Beer…Even More, noticed that at the start of her career, she Was one of only two or three women at beer events. She recalls that at one particular event where she was speaking, two male festival goers informed her they decided not to sit in on her talk because “they probably knew more about beer than she did.” And although she was the first person to receive the title of Master Cicerone in Canada, the media ran with the story that she was the first woman. In general, however, she’s received nothing but support from people who know the industry, and know beer.

A similar experience happened when Jamie Baertsch, the first female brewmaster in Wisconsin, was ordering her in-line carbonation unit and a silo. On two separate occasions, the Moosejaw & Wisconsin Dells Brewing Company brewer was told to put the brewmaster on the phone as they didn’t want to talk to the secretary. But again, within the industry, Baertsch’s experiences have been positive. After working her way through scrubbing floors and polishing tanks, she attended the Master Brewers Assocation of America for Brewing and Malting. She expressed gratitude for her fellow brewers, generally all male, at the time, who helped her navigate and troubleshoot her first year as head brewer in 2005.

“They had nothing to gain by helping me, but they didn’t care,” Baertsch says. “They just wanted me to be able to make great beer.”

Read the full article at http://glbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Women+In+Beer/1731819/212936/article.html.

Penrose

Jeff Sparrow

With the explosion of new craft breweries within the Chicago city limits reaching nuclear proportions, one of the most anticipated new breweries of 2014 lies to the west of the Fox River. Penrose Brewing, the creation of two Goose Island alumni, opened this past April in the exurban city of Geneva, IL.

Co-founder and brewer Tom Korder actually started his passion for brewing while working for Anheuser-Busch, where he worked in the Research Pilot Brewery, a small 15-Bbl brewery at the heart of their Saint Louis plant. "There I worked with a small group of people to brew beer, drag hoses and focus on new test recipes,” said Korder.

An engineer by degree, Korder once managed the operations of the Goose Island production brewery, where he met his eventual partner Eric Hobbs. A Geneva native, Hobb's brings a sales and marketing background to complement Korder's knowledge of beer and brewing. "We track our relationship back to a beer dinner we did together at Tiny Lounge in Chicago," korder explained," where we fi rst realized that our views on beer, beer education and beer culture aligned.

A Different Focus

Korder and Hobbs are focused on brewing beers that they like to drink—a mantra that often leads to a line of hoppy, high alcohol beers. Penrose, though, will feature Belgian-inspired styles in the lower alcohol range. "We feel that Belgian styles offer a wide range of fl avor profi les as a template for a lot of experimentation," said Korder.

Year around beers include Proto Gradus single, P2 pale ale, Navette black ale and Devoir, a saison. “Wait until you see my 3.8% (ABV) beers," Korder beamed. When asked about higher alcohol craft beers being the ones that generally demand a higher price, Korder is adamant. "One of the things that we like to preach is that people should be associating quality with price, not ABV with price."

Penrose sports 4,000 square feet of space containing a 40-barrel brewhouse, on which Korder plans to brew 3,000 barrels of accessible, sociable beers a year. The brewery also includes a barrel store house, and a tap room up front, a place to meet friends and taste beers—perhaps eight at a time—either in sample sizes or Belgian-looking goblets. On any given day you might also fi nd some limited tap room-only brews, created on the smaller pilot brew system. No food, though, this is a brewery tap, not a restaurant.

"We wanted to put all of our efforts into the beer at the tap room, which left little time to think about a food option, said Korder. No food trucks, either, a growing presence at beer establishments without kitchens. "We are looking to bring in local restaurants and caterers in the next few months to show off the businesses around us that support us on a daily basis, rather than bringing in a food truck from the city," added Korder. Patrons can also travel a short distance to patronize one of Geneva's many fi ne restaurants, many of which will serve Penrose beer. Look for bottles and kegs in bars and restaurants across eight Chicagoland counties, and eventually 4-packs in package stores. "We feel that four-packs offer a nice quantity for sampling," Korder explained.

Barrel Action

That space I mentioned dedicated to actual barrels will also see quite a bit of action. "One of the things that we set out to do was to build a barrel program, rather than just aging beer in barrels just for the hell of it," said Korder. He's looking forward to brewing a lot of different barrel-aged styles, playing off traditional techniques with wine and spirits, and also bringing in historical beer processes. "A lot of our future projects are rooted in expressing the different characteristics of the barrels in conjunction with the beer that ages in them."

Art and Science

That's all quite a bit of complexity for a small, local brewery, but looks can be deceiving, and the simple quite complex. The name Penrose, for instance, came to Korder from his interest in works by artist MC Escher, known for his dizzying array of mathematically inspired art. "I started researching the methods and techniques and came across a pattern of tessellations called a Penrose tiling pattern," said Korder, which would inspire the brewery logo. "At the end of the day, beer always comes across as an artistic expression in a glass, but what got it there was the chemistry and biology of the brewing process."

Read the full article at http://glbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Penrose/1731820/212936/article.html.

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