Great Lakes Brewing News February/March 2010 : Page 1

Best if Read by Feb/March 2010 Vol. 15/No. 1 HA Completely By Lucy Saunders If the monks who brew beer call it “liquid bread,” then for Valentine’s Day, think of it as “liquid cake.” Craft beer and chocolate make a completely harmoni- ous match, whether prepared together in a recipe, or paired at the table. There is neuroscience behind the choice. Chocolate releases the same dopa- Owners Annetta Jewell and Peter Bulut Jr. offer Great Lakes Brewing visitors a new roster of specialty brews. armonious Match mine chemicals in the brain triggered by romantic love, and beer tends to relax and reduce social inhibitions, which makes the process of tasting beer and chocolate all the more enjoyable. The feel-good combination of fer- mented cocoa beans and fermented grain is popular across North America. In my hometown of Milwaukee, chefs such as John Raymond of Roots and Jason See Chocolate continued on p.4 State by State News Beer and Brewing Events ...................3 Jolly Giant Review ..............................5 Black Creek Historic Brewery..............8 Beer & Health .....................................9 Homebrew News .............................11 Beer Beacon:Belgian Beers ............. 12 Michigan ............ 14 Illinois ............... 16 Pennsylvania ..... 25 New York ........... 26 Ontario ............... 30 Ohio ................... 31 Wisconsin .......... 32 Minnesota .......... 34 Indiana .............. 36 By Robert Hughey F or a brewery that prided itself for quite some time on one lager, Golden Horseshoe Lager, the Great Lakes Brewery, Toronto, ON, took on a vastly different persona as of 2006 when it branched out to make a whole range of flavour- ful ales. Following the arrival of Red Leaf Lager and Black Jack Lager, now character, some creativity,” said president, Peter Bulut Jr., who along with his sister, Anetta Jewell, both owners, run the show at the Great Lakes Brewery. Great Lakes Brewery, Toronto PHOTO BY ROBERT HUGHEY sadly on sabbatical, came the first big ale, Devil’s Pale Ale. “We made lagers that were good and friendly, but we wanted to show some Following thorough research they found a medieval style of ale that was a bit off-the-wall. It just happened to be June 6, 2006, which they then tied to the highway legend, the road sign and to steel, hence the 666 in the logo. They used the Toronto Beer Festival as a testing ground for Devil’s Pale Ale. The “kids” loved the logo. The beer geeks loved the beer. And so they launched an ever growing range of season- als from their brewery, which was estab- lished in 1987. See Great Lakes continued on p.6

Beer & Chocolate

Lucy Saunders

If the monks who brew beer call it “liquid bread,” then for Valentine’s Day, think of it as “liquid cake.” Craft beer and chocolate make a completely harmonious match, whether prepared together in a recipe, or paired at the table.

There is neuroscience behind the choice. Chocolate releases the same dopa-Mine chemicals in the brain triggered by romantic love, and beer tends to relax and reduce social inhibitions, which makes the process of tasting beer and chocolate all the more enjoyable.

The feel-good combination of fermented cocoa beans and fermented grain is popular across North America.

In my hometown of Milwaukee, chefs such as John Raymond of Roots and Jason Gorman of Dream Dance have turned to chocolate and cocoa in their beer dinners as staple ingredients to highlight the roasty flavors of a dark stout or a bock.

Not just any beer, mind you. The best possible matches, in keeping with the sweet spirit of the day, are harmonious, melding complementary flavors of roasted cocoa beans and roasted barley malts, and perhaps just a bit of heat from a peppery nose of alcohol.

In Wisconsin, Tyranena Brewing Co.

Offers its Chocolate Imperial Porter on draft, brewed with real cocoa nibs, chocolate and other assorted barley malts plus a wee bit of oatmeal for silky texture on the palate.

Cocoa powder, cocoa nibs (the bits of the roasted cacao pod before conching into chocolate) and even real chocolate have been used to brew beer. In 1995, the Whitbread Brewing Co. In the UK launched a chocolate beer, the Fuggles Chocolate Ale flavored with cocoa extract. Samuel Adams Chocolate Bock is aged with cocoa nibs from the Swiss chocolatier, Feltin. Southern Tier Brewing Co. Brews its Choklat Imperial Stout with real Belgian chocolate, for a beer that tastes like liquid chocolate. Viking Brewery of Dallas, WI even makes a seasonal Hot Chocolate, a chocolate stout brewed with organic cocoa and a pinch of cayenne pepper. The aromatics of bittersweet cocoa, roasted coffee notes, and the peppery finish make this a versatile ale for dessert or dinner.

I love barley wines and Belgian dubbels paired with dark chocolate desserts, since the warming strength of the higher-gravity ales can match the intense, fermented flavors in the darkest chocolates. Bocks, porters and stouts meld with milk chocolates or desserts that blend chocolate with nuts, caramel or other berry fruits. Fruit beers, such as cherry or raspberry ales, are also good choices to pair with dark chocolates - or as Sebbie Buhler, the woman whose image graces the label of Rogue Ales Chocolate Stout, recommends - mix half raspberry framboise, half Rogue Chocolate Stout as a dessert drink. Sprecher Brewery blended raspberry and chocolate flavors in their Generation Porter, a special release first Made for their 20th anniversary in 2005, and re-issued as a limited release.

My favorite experiment: pairing a very hoppy IPA with a taste of super dark, 70 percent cocoa solids premium chocolate. The tang of the Cascade hops accented the dark chocolate almost as citrus zest would, with a sparkling, tart finish.

Home cooks can pair the flavors of beer with chocolate in savory sauces, such as chocolate and chile mole for roasted meats, or in sweets such as fresh-baked desserts. I’ve made brownies, cookies, ice cream, syrup topping for ice cream, mousse filling for cake and frostings, and more. Here is a recipe from my cookbook, “The Best of American Beer and Food” (Brewers Publications, $22.95), which brings together beer and chocolate in a flourless chocolate cake filled with molten ganache, perfect for a Valentine’s Day dessert for beer lovers.

Old Chub Chocolate Mole

This recipe is adapted from one created by Denver chef Charles Edson using the Oskar Blues Old Chub brand of Scotch ale. I adapted it to be thicker and sweeter by adding caramelized onion and garlic to offset the hoppy bitterness of the ale.

Note: Garam masala is an Indian spice blend of ground cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, coriander, and black pepper. You may substitute a pinch of each of those spices if you can’t find the premixed garam masala in Asian food sections or ethnic groceries.

Ingredients: 1 tablespoon canola oil 1 cup minced Vidalia onion 2 tablespoons minced garlic 1 1/4 cups chicken stock 1 cup golden raisins 3 dried ancho chiles, crushed **

* * Use caution in handling hot peppers and wash hands thoroughly before touching eyes.

Method:

1. Heat oil in large saucepan over low heat; stir in onion and garlic and cook until caramelized, about 10 minutes. Add chicken stock, raisins and chiles; raise heat to medium and simmer 10-15 minutes, or until stock is mostly absorbed. Add garam masala and salt and remove from heat.

2. When cool, place mixture in food processor fitted with metal chopping blade and add toasted nuts. Cover and pulse on HIGH until mixture turns pasty.

3. Return mixture to saucepan and place over low heat. Slowly add Scotch ale until desired consistency is reached, best as a thick gravy. Add grated chocolate and stir until melted. Taste and adjust seasonings. Use over roasted and shredded turkey or chicken.

Makes 2 1/2 cups Suggested pairing: Chocolate stout or dark ale

Flourless Chocolate Cake with Molten Ganache

(Makes 8 servings) Executive Chef Jeff Foresman of the Hyatt Regency Hill Country Resort and Spa in Texas prepared this special dessert for a dinner hosted by Jaime Jurado and the Spoetzl Brewery of Shiner, Texas. I recommend making the ganache ahead of time so it’s easy to bake and serve warm, with a glass of stout or doppelbock for dessert.

Ganache 3 /4 cup heavy cream 4 ounces unsalted butter 1/4 cup granulated sugar 8 ounces good quality bittersweet chocolate, chopped (Callebaut recommended) In a medium saucepan, heat cream, butter, and sugar over medium heat.

Bring to a simmer. Remove from heat, add dark chocolate and whisk well until melted.

Let cool until set.

Flourless Chocolate Cake: 12 ounces unsalted butter 8 ounces quality bittersweet chocolate, chopped (Callebaut recommended) 4 eggs 4 egg yolks 1/ 3 cup granulated sugar 1/ 4 cup dark wheat beer (Shiner Dunkelweizen was used in the original recipe) 8 (4-ounce) buttered ramekins or small soufflé cups Method:

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Melt butter in a large saucepan over low heat, add chopped chocolate and stir until melted and smooth. Remove from heat. (Or, place chopped chocolate and butter in microwave-safe bowl, cover and heat on MEDIUM for 30 seconds.

Remove from microwave, stir, and heat again on MEDIUM 30 seconds.) Stir until melted.

Do not overcook.

2. Combine eggs, yolks, and sugar in mixing bowl of standing electric mixer fitted with paddle attachment. Beat until ribbon forms, 8 to 10 minutes. Fold in chocolate butter mixture.

Stir in beer and scrape sides of bowl. Divide equally between ramekins. Bake 8 to 10 minutes.

3. Remove from oven and place a two ounce scoop of ganache (recipe follows) in center of each ramekin. Replace in oven and bake 30 minutes. Remove from oven, let cool for 5 minutes and serve immediately.

Read the full article at http://glbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Beer+%26amp%3Bamp%3B+Chocolate/324126/31834/article.html.

The Great Lakes Brewery

Robert Hughey

For a brewery that prided itself for quite some time on one lager, Golden Horseshoe Lager, the Great Lakes Brewery, Toronto, ON, took on a vastly different persona as of 2006 when it branched out to make a whole range of flavourful ales.

Following the arrival of Red Leaf Lager and Black Jack Lager, now sadly on sabbatical, came the first big ale, Devil’s Pale Ale.

“We made lagers that were good and friendly, but we wanted to show some Character, some creativity,” said president, Peter Bulut Jr., who along with his sister, Anetta Jewell, both owners, run the show at the Great Lakes Brewery.

Following thorough research they found a medieval style of ale that was a bit off-the-wall. It just happened to be June 6, 2006, which they then tied to the highway legend, the road sign and to steel, hence the 666 in the logo.

They used the Toronto Beer Festival as a testing ground for Devil’s Pale Ale. The “kids” loved the logo. The beer geeks loved the beer.

And so they launched an ever growing range of seasonals from their brewery, which was established in 1987.

“We offered a unique flavour from traditional lager guys.” In the fall they got to thinking about a Christmas offering, to give something unique to their customers instead of the usual Christmas baskets. Why not a beer in special packaging? Indeed. So they went about researching winter seasonals as they didn’t want to copy an existing brand in the marketplace. They designed a beer, purchased 750 ml bottles from Belgium and had them embossed, with an eye to launching the new brew at the annual Christmas party at the brewery. The night before the party all hands were on deck as they bottled the Winter Ale, some 1,400 bottles in all. At the Christmas event the beer was available on draught and anyone who tasted it wanted to buy it immediately. A further 600 bottles found their way into the retail store at the front of the brewery, handily selling out before Christmas. This got the gang at the Great Lakes Brewery to thinking about what other beers hadn’t been brewed before.

Brewing Specialty Beers Next up came Orange Peel Ale. The brewery found a former tobacco farmer who possessed infrared drying technology that allowed them to purchase and process 200 pounds of clean orange peels. They could now store the peels at whatever volume and use them when needed. In fact, they could now have processed and store whatever fruit Or vegetable they deemed worthy using in brewing. The Orange Peel Ale saw a spring Release of around 12,000 bottles, which sold out a month earlier than expected.

In 2007, Great Lakes Brewery pitched a pumpkin ale to the LCBO for fall release.

The pumpkin was cleaned, cut and dried, arriving at the brewery in a pellet format somewhat smaller than a hop pellet. It was decided that it would perform better in the brewhouse as a flour, and to that end a coffee grinder was cleaned and used to grind the pellets.

The resulting flour was added to the kettle with pungently good results. The Pumpkin Ale was embraced by the beer drinking public, selling Out at the LCBO in under 20 days.

The 2007 Winter Ale saw part of the production sold through Nova Scotia liquor stores, the first and very successful beer export of the brewery. Next seasonal up was Green Tea Ale in 2008.

“There was a huge demand for Green Tea Ale.

We wanted to give Ontario beer drinkers a chance to experience something they hadn’t had before,” said Bulut Jr.

Hopping on Board Following this was more of a traditional pale ale, a west coast style ale at 5.2 percent abv and 32 IBUs. The malt bill has 2-row malt, crystal and carastan. Northern Brewer, Perle and Cascade hops find their way into the brew kettle. It is also dry hopped for good measure. It will be sold in 650 ml bombers with similar graphics to the rest Of the seasonals. It will only be available in bottle at the retail store and on tap at select bars and restaurants. Great Lakes Brewery wants to develop the seasonals and give them greater distribution so more people can enjoy these new beers.

Bulut Jr. Says he has seen strong growth in the last three years from Ontario people wanting to support Ontario beer. To this end, Great Lakes produces T-shirts that declare: ‘Support your local brewery’, not just the Great Lakes Brewery but all microbreweries in the province.

In the upcoming year, Great Lakes Brewery is working to cut energy cost and usage for water, gas and electricity. It also wants to make the brewery a destination.

To that end, the brewery plans to add a 1,200 square foot special event space that can hold anywhere from 20 to 150 people.

And the retail store is soon to be expanded.

They have also been working at developing Project X, a monthly get together at the brewery for beer and food enthusiasts. For a $10 membership fee, punters get a pint glass and a brewery T-shirt. The most recent event saw 80 participants sampling a new brew alongside some delicious beer-accented foods from a local supplier.

The last three years have seen the brewery raising funds to support local initiatives such as the Daily Food Bank, which saw them gather some 3,200 pounds of food as part of a Christmas drive. A summer BBQ raises funds for Gatehouse, which supports victims of child abuse, this time bringing in $5,000 for this worthy cause. Bulut Jr. Wants to see these numbers grow.

The Brewery The brewery is located in a 38,000 square foot former gun machine shop, which is highly visible from the QEW expressway. Brewer Kali Kalimuthu has at his disposal a brewhouse that has a 50 hectolitre solid copper, fire-brewed kettle, a single stage mash-lauter tun, a 50 Hl whirlpool, an oversized heat exchanger that whips through a brew in just 30 minutes, 12 X 120 Hl fermenters, 3 X 60 Hl bright beer tanks, 1 X 120 Hl bright beer tank, and one 560 Hl bright beer tank. There are 4 X 560 Hl aging tanks and a Semac 16-head, adjustable bottler that runs at 48 bottles per minute, as well as a 5-head Cask can line added in 2007 that does 35 cans a minute. Devil’s Pale Ale was the first beer to be canned (in 473 ml cans). They have also built a .5 Hl pilot system for recipe development.

The Beers Golden Horseshoe Premium Lager, a 5 percent abv golden lager, has a polished lemony straw colour and fresh malt aromas emanating richly from the glass. Light in body, the mouthfeel has luscious malt punctuated by a soft hop bitterness. Some malt sweetness is apparent on the palate. The balanced finish is rather brisk as malt mingles with hops tantalizingly and then slips away from this crisp refreshing lager.

Red Leaf Smooth Red Lager, 5 percent abv, also utilizes Canadian malt and fresh hops from Germany, with the addition of specialty malt to achieve a reddish-brown colour and a full flavoured lager taste.

Devil’s Pale Ale, a hearty ale hitting

6. 6 percent abv ale, is a burnished deep mahogany coloured full-bodied ale having six malts and four hops in its composition.

It pours with a creamy, mocha head, releasing aromas of fruit, malt and hops. On the palate, a penetrating hop bitterness breaches the firm malt flavours. The middle sees a growing depth of bitterness. A lengthy and flavourful finish delivers suitable bitterness on a resilient malt base, with a rising and gentle malt sweetness coupled with a touch of fruitiness.

Great Lakes Winter Ale is a true winter warmer, weighing in at 6.2 percent abv, with a rich chestnut colour and a distinctive ruby hue. Handcrafted with a variety of specialty hops and malts, combined with generous amounts of cinnamon, ginger, honey and orange peel, this beer pours with a thick crop of almond coloured foam, while releasing enticing aromatics of fruit, spice, Christmas pudding notes, cedar and sappy, fresh cut wood. This fairly full bodied ale delivers notes of port, a dash of warming alcohol and a late hit of ginger dryness. The complex compendium of flavours make the Great Lakes Winter Ale a very fine brew indeed. The impressive packaging, a limited edition, stencilled 750 ml bottle with foil wrapping complete the picture. Some decent cellaring potential here.

Orange Peel Ale is brewed with six different malts (2-row and a number of specialty ones), and five varieties of hops, including Saaz and Cascade. Also in the mix are generous amounts of dried orange peel going directly into the boil, mainly in the later stages. Orange Peel Ale is packaged in 650 ml bottles, stencilled in a very similar motif to the brewery’s Winter Ale.

Pumpkin Ale is a spritzy beer that features spicy cloves and some bitterness, and a drier than expected finish, making it very drinkable.

Green Tea Ale, at 4.2 percent abv, releases a gentle spiciness. It’s brewed with organic Gunpowder Green Tea and Ontario grown ginseng, giving it a subtle herbal flavour.

The Great Lakes Brewery went a little wild, but happily so, at Toronto’s Festival of Beer, serving up such delightful cask offerings as 416 Summer Fix, Superior IPA, Pompous Ass Pale Ale, Morning Glory Breakfast Stout, Green Tea Ale, Silly Pucker Raspberry Rhubarb, Uvula Ale, Waupoosalizer Snakebite, Sage and Spruce Wit, Blond Jagerbomb, Black Forest Porter, Sweet Pete’s Peach Wheat, Snaggle Tooth Pumpkin Ale, Kaptain Kölsch, Up In Smoke Rauchbier, Iron Eagle Pilsner, Lil Abbey Ale, Soggy Summer Ale, Neutron Bomb Double IPA and Simon Says Stout during the course of the event.

“There is so much opportunity for new beer styles and growth. It’s going to be another good year for beer,” said Peter Bulut Jr. Enthusiastically.

Read the full article at http://glbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/The+Great+Lakes+Brewery/324134/31834/article.html.

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